Linn Forums

Current time: 2017-10-18, 08:22 Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Linn Forums / Music / Recorded Music v / The Inner Game of Music

Post Reply 
The Inner Game of Music
2012-08-31, 15:52
Post: #1
The Inner Game of Music
'Like most of the UK, for the last few weeks I have been gripped by the Olympics and Paralympics, and in particular by the immaculate performances of many of the athletes. I especially enjoyed watching our man Tom Daley in the diving final.

For those of you who didn't see it, he took the bold decision of appealing after his first dive because camera flashes had put him off and requested that he should be allowed another dive. He was granted a repeat 1st dive, and promptly nailed it. In front of about 15.9 million people.

It struck me that the mental processes involved in controlling one's nerves in this discipline, especially at such a critical moment as this, must be quite similar to that of a musician. Months of preparation behind the scenes, before a performance in which you have to execute precise and exact movements in perfect combination, perfectly timed and in front of a massive global audience. Everything in preparation is geared and aimed towards a few vital, nerve-racking moments.'

...

Pre-match nerves and how top performers deal with them - read the rest of Prince Consort pianist Alisdair Hogarth's blog at http://blogs.linn.co.uk/music/alisdair-h...-music.php
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-08-31, 22:15 (This post was last modified: 2012-08-31 22:15 by Warren.)
Post: #2
RE: The Inner Game of Music
I think there is a major flaw with these Linn blogs. In communication one has to prove expertise straight up front, why should I read it. These blogs don't. The quote was a good read, so I read the blog. Ah, this is by a musician. And a high-calibre, young-Hugh-Jackman-looking one too. But this isn't established up front.

The first Linn blog I read was by Gilad, so I've always assumed these blogs were by staff I didn't know.

The blog should open like this.

[Image: attachment.php?aid=4593]


Attached File(s) Thumbnail(s)
   

Cymbiosis Klimax LP12 SE - Karmen Kandid, Radikal/1M KDS/1 KK/1 Solos/1 K200 242/1
Kisto, AV 2250/d, Komponent 104
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-09-01, 10:38
Post: #3
RE: The Inner Game of Music
Thanks for this comment Warren; I like what you've done with the page...you must be a computer whizz! Hope you enjoyed the blog.

Best,
Al
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-09-02, 00:30 (This post was last modified: 2012-09-02 00:32 by Warren.)
Post: #4
RE: The Inner Game of Music
Hello Alisdair,

Glad you liked the layout.

I'd like to hope I'm as accomplished on my keyboard as you are on yours.

I did enjoy this Inner Game blog in several ways.

I can relate to piano playing, as I chose to learn to play the piano for five years during my Computing PhD, joyfully practising my Hanon finger exercises precisely. I also noticed similarities between figuring out how to join together the sections of the rondo Fur Elise and figuring out how to best join together the various ideas and chapters in my thesis.

I'm in a similar performance field, training of various forms. Thus performing in front of audiences of a dozen to a hundred from an hour to a few days. I still have some very detailed specifics to perform, though on the whole my delivery is less precise. I have a few dozen concepts to get across accurately and with great precision, but not hundreds or thousands of notes (or words) to deliver exactly as someone else wrote them. I also need to change what I say for each different audience. Actually there is a great amount of time spent learning a new course and precise definitions and so specific long sequences of words. However, once learned, that course is delivered regularly, typically for years. So I spend most of the time at a stage where I'll have a quick look at my notes and just stand up and say whatever comes to mind as being the most appropriate thing to communicate. Ultimately I'm not about delivering the same message each time, I'm interested in getting each audience to the same destination, regardless of how we get there.

Early in my career I did have nerves. Initially there were nerves for minutes, then just the few minutes before starting to speak until I got into the flow of what I was saying. Now, these nerves rarely exist as I'm just focussed on my audience and I'm keen to share with them what they need to know. Passion and enthusiasm being better emotions than fear and anxiety. Yes, I'm the delivery mechanism through which they'll learn, however I've delivered successfully many times before, so I'll likely be successful again this time, and likely slightly better this time as I'm now a bit more experienced. Perhaps I need to be more focussed on my audience than a musician: you're there to delivery the written notes; I'm there to make sure they understand, thus I have to focus on them to see if they are understanding and adapt what I'm doing if not.

Having enjoyed this blog, I'm now slowly progressing through your previous blogs. Practice Makes was also interesting as again this relates to what I do. The last few years I've found I can make faster better progress in my head towards accuracy and clarity, before I do something physically.

These blogs are great to read. It greatly adds to what I've learned over the last couple of years about musicians and the practicalities of your profession, from having attended things like open tuition sessions and rehearsals.

Cymbiosis Klimax LP12 SE - Karmen Kandid, Radikal/1M KDS/1 KK/1 Solos/1 K200 242/1
Kisto, AV 2250/d, Komponent 104
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-09-02, 09:07
Post: #5
RE: The Inner Game of Music
Hi Warren,

Thanks so much for your further comments; the guy who does the PR for the Prince Consort always says that the laptop keyboard is his instrument too!

As you say, connections in music are a real issue (as are connections in a thesis, or article) and often you can perfect a section in the practice room, but then connect it to what has gone before and it can all go hopelessly wrong again. When I practise I always make sure I practise both difficult sections, and then I practise connecting that section to the bits either side.

It sounds like what you do is very similar to a musician in many ways, but perhaps even closer to an improvisor rather than an interpreter, as you are presenting your own material (although I'm sure interpretation of other people's material plays a part in it?)? Improvisors almost have to prepare more than interpreters (or at least need to be as comfortable in their material), precisely because they have to be so fluent in their material that they can depart from it and return to it in a coherent way.

Your point about the natural confidence that results from having successfully performed many times before is extremely applicable to music. In fact, I'd add that it also gives you greater confidence in picking yourself up if you've done a performance you're not happy with; you begin to realise that actually provided you have done your preparation, the performance is likely not to have been anywhere near as bad as you perhaps felt in the moment. When I was a student I'd dwell on a disappointing performance; now if it happens, I tend to get straight back on the horse and look ahead to how I can improve the next one.

I'm glad you enjoy the blogs, and thanks again for your comments Warren.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-09-03, 10:28
Post: #6
RE: The Inner Game of Music
Thanks for your comments and blog 2.0 mock-up - I like it. Will hopefully be getting some upgrades to the music blog in future and we'll definitely be making them a bit more customised and interactive. In the meantime we have to choose good quotes and let the power of words convince you to read...which this one did Wink
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-09-03, 12:52
Post: #7
RE: The Inner Game of Music
My Girlfriend also enjoyed watching Tom Daley. I told her she was wasting here time. I'm not sure she - or Tom - are fully accepting of the true situation yet however.

Source: Klimax DS/1, Sneaky DS, Denon DVD-A1UD

Control: Klimax Kontrol/1, Denon AVP-A1HDA

Playback: Klimax Solo/1, Klimax 350P, Klimax 340A, Custom 2K 106C, Monitor Audio GXFX, Denon POA-A1HD
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2012-09-29, 18:57
Post: #8
RE: The Inner Game of Music
When one does a high platform dive you know its wrong or right as soon as you jump.
On a piano its three keys.
Mud.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
2013-03-24, 11:18
Post: #9
RE: The Inner Game of Music
(2012-09-29 18:57)Mudcrutch Wrote:  When one does a high platform dive you know its wrong or right as soon as you jump. Especially if the water is missing!
On a piano its three keys.
Mud.

String Driven Things, & Wound Up Things
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)