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Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
2018-04-08, 22:47
Post: #1
Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
I´ve two C4200 - Amps, but unfortunately only one of them has a dynamik power supply installed. Actually I can buy a brand new dynamik power supply.

Can I install the power supply by myself without a Linn dealer? Has anyone a link to the manual for the 'power supply upgrade procedure'?
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2018-04-09, 06:19
Post: #2
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
(2018-04-08 22:47)jsp_de Wrote:  I´ve two C4200 - Amps, but unfortunately only one of them has a dynamik power supply installed. Actually I can buy a brand new dynamik power supply.

Can I install the power supply by myself without a Linn dealer? Has anyone a link to the manual for the 'power supply upgrade procedure'?
I have no manual, but I have done the upgrade myself in 2 devices.

Just open up both your amps so you can compare them, look at the internals and if you think you feel comfortable with it, just do it. If you don't feel comfortable, let a dealer worry about it.

What are they asking for the power supply?

Tin can telephone system.
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2018-04-09, 14:24 (This post was last modified: 2018-04-09 14:38 by Briain.)
Post: #3
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
Hi

Firstly, a very warm welcome to the Linn forum! Smile It can be great fun here, so I hope you enjoy some of the discussions (and some of the banter) that occur here (and indeed join in, too)! Wink

Back to the Dynamik upgrade and whilst it is entirely possible for a seasoned electronics hobby enthusiast to change a power supply, I should point out that Linn would state (very, very strongly) that this is most certainly a dealer job, and they'd do so for some very good reasons:

1. Safety (to both you and to the equipment)
2. Dealers have access to the works instruction detailing the procedure
3. Dealers should be equipped with anti-static facilities

I used to work for a Linn dealer and have thus done such jobs (on the older systems, like 2200s, original KDS and KK) but I have not seen the inside of a 4200, so even if I wished to (and more critically, was permitted to by the forum rules) I could not advise on same (as I have no longer have access to the works instructions). Even if I did, likely it would result in a forum ban for advising someone on how to do so (and I would agree with that policy)!

In terms of the three points listed:

1. Safety is an obvious one as the job involves changing a mains connected module, so there's safety in terms of danger of death from electrocution (I'm not suggesting that you would do it whilst the amp is plugged in, but you never know, someone might try doing that) but also the safety of the equipment to consider (getting it wrong and damaging the amplifier; for example, there are heat pads that need to be correctly placed, so getting that wrong could result in failure due to localised overheating). Of course, getting it wrong could also involve something like plugging in the DC power cable incorrectly (or mounting the board incorrectly and shorting something) so that likely would completely destroy the power supply and the amplifier board. Again, I'm not suggesting you would do that, but as Linn have no way of judging a customer's experience, they could not possibly encourage such activities (so any discussion on such techniques would be quite rightly removed from this forum).

2. Access to the works instruction is important, for reasons pretty much covered in the above paragraph. These are only available to dealers, again for all the reasons given above.

3. Anti-static precautions is an often ignored issue that can also seriously damage equipment. Electronics comprise tiny semiconductors which are designed to work at very low Voltages and static discharges can comprise 10's of thousands of Volts, so the mere act of touching the innards of a modern device can either result in a static discharge degrading a transistor or integrated circuit (such that it's performance is degraded, and that it fails early) or it can often totally destroy it (so it fails immediately).

I would like to think that all dealers are fully aware of the anti-static element of the above and that anyone approved (by Linn) to do such work have their workshops equipped with anti-static bench mats, anti-static straps and wrist bands.

As a footnote on static discharge:

This is often an overlooked area, but it is actually a massively important one, so it is worth mentioning a little more about it all, just to remind everyone why it is so important:

Many years ago (when I worked in BT) some new equipment trolleys appeared (these being to support test equipment which needed wheeled about to the rack of equipment needing work done) and it was discovered that wheeling them a few 10s of meters resulted in a static build up of several 10s of thousands Volts, so the wheels needed changing to ones which leaked that static to the floor and thus prevented same. Without that, the chances were high that someone would wheel it across the equipment room, then after touch it, then pull a card of electronics from a rack and totally zap it with the static discharge. Below illustrates an actual example of where even quite small static discharges had a very measurable (and very costly) impact to equipment being modified (and this applies even more so with current electronics; they are now much more sensitive to such events).

When I was commissioning systems that were being installed in the network, there was a small team of people modifying some of the printed circuit boards (correcting a design error) that were then to be used in these systems, and despite them all sitting at a bench with anti-static matting, they were not wearing their wrist bands and straps (these contain 2 x 2 megohm resistors in series, so permit a very high impedance to ground (to prevent static building up in the wearer) but with it being 4 megohms, it's high enough to remain safe (should the user be maintaining working equipment and inadvertently touch something with a highish Voltage on it). I was getting a huge failure rate with the modified cards (above 10%; some days, very significantly above that) so I spoke to the team and got them to wear their straps, then the failure rate plummeted to nearly zero; quite a result!

Here in the Scotland, I've often heard the misguided comment that it is cold and damp here (well, that part of it is true) and that wearing anti-static straps is a waste of time, but folks tend to forget that in winter, a centrally heated home is actually a very dry environment. If I remove my jumper then touch my laptop case, I do get a static shock (so if I touched the internal printed circuit board, likely that would zap something and break the laptop) whereas if I do it whilst wearing an anti-static wrist band and the 4 megohm discharge cable to ground, there is no static shock.

Of course, that means wearing the wristband around ones ankle (try taking a pullover off with it on your wrist) but there is a safety issue doing that, too. Though convenient (as the wire doesn't get dragged across the bench when working on stuff) one tends to forget about it, then walk away from the bench and find ones leg is still attached - via a wire - to the grounding point! Decades of wearing anti-static bands and I still occasionally do that! Big Grin

Anyhow, sorry for the long post, but it is very important to highlight at least some of the potential downfalls; you should not even consider doing such a job unless you are a properly trained technician and thus know how to do it both safely and correctly.

All the best
Bri Smile

KDS/1 (music) + ADSM (AV) -> KK/1 -> 350A + miniDSP time & phase aligned 345 rear sub
ADS/0 -> Homebrew fixed attenuator -> 2250/D -> 212 and Sizmik front sub (bedroom)
MDSI -> 104C (awaiting installation in my kitchen)
MDSI -> Shahinian Arc (installed at my mum's house)
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2018-04-09, 14:50 (This post was last modified: 2018-04-09 15:30 by Briain.)
Post: #4
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
PS A footnote to the footnote on static:

Incidentally, a few years ago I walked into a HiFi shop, just to see what they were selling (I won't say in which town this was) and saw a couple of the staff in the sales area, shuffling their feet on the carpet (which likely had a high nylon content to ensure toughness and longevity) whilst poking about inside a CD player, trying to get the mechanism out (or perhaps they had just dropped their 'happy pills' through the air vents; goodness knows what they were attempting to do) and with no signs of anti-static precautions, whatsoever. I was tempted to say 'well, if it wasn't broken before, likely it will be by now', but I instead just turned around and walked out (perhaps I ought to have explained why, but clearly any such comment would not even have been understood). Wink

So yes, I take static very seriously! Smile

KDS/1 (music) + ADSM (AV) -> KK/1 -> 350A + miniDSP time & phase aligned 345 rear sub
ADS/0 -> Homebrew fixed attenuator -> 2250/D -> 212 and Sizmik front sub (bedroom)
MDSI -> 104C (awaiting installation in my kitchen)
MDSI -> Shahinian Arc (installed at my mum's house)
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2018-04-15, 16:34
Post: #5
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
(2018-04-09 06:19)Tin Wrote:  
(2018-04-08 22:47)jsp_de Wrote:  I´ve two C4200 - Amps, but unfortunately only one of them has a dynamik power supply installed. Actually I can buy a brand new dynamik power supply.

Can I install the power supply by myself without a Linn dealer? Has anyone a link to the manual for the 'power supply upgrade procedure'?
I have no manual, but I have done the upgrade myself in 2 devices.

Just open up both your amps so you can compare them, look at the internals and if you think you feel comfortable with it, just do it. If you don't feel comfortable, let a dealer worry about it.

What are they asking for the power supply?

The power supply I have just (4m ago) bought on ebay for 350 euro - new, original packaging
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2018-04-15, 16:44
Post: #6
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
Nice Smile

Tin can telephone system.
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2018-05-01, 23:32
Post: #7
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
thanks to all for the helpful answers. I have changed the power suplly sucessful by myself - it was an easy job, most difficult part was to lift of the pre-dynamik power supply from the heatsink-pads. @ briain I followed your instructions and used antistatic equipment ..
Akurate DS1, 2 x C 4200 (Dynamik), Aktiv Cards, Akurate 212 MK1 - :-)
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2018-05-02, 06:18
Post: #8
RE: Dynamik power supply upgrade procedure
Congratulations. Smile
Our setups look quite similar, so you have great taste. Big Grin

Tin can telephone system.
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