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Major change in the music industry
2011-02-05, 05:12 (This post was last modified: 2014-02-23 20:09 by linnrd.)
Post: #31
RE: Major change in the music industry
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Boring stuff->Linn Blacks->More boring stuff
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2011-02-05, 11:33
Post: #32
RE: Major change in the music industry
I started buying hi-fi when I was 18 years old...Leak valve pre-amp, power amp, Sugden turntable, Wharefdale speaker (yes it was Mono). In those days I bought the "Gramaphone" magazine every month and can remember the first announcement and review of the LP12. I eventually progressed to my current Linn, Arcam, B&W, Wharefdale, Gallo, Denon setups (three of them in different rooms). I listen to music (some of it master downloads) and watch films (5.1) most days of the week. I now have three adult sons who between then have a massive collection of music on CD's, but they listen to it on kit from Richer Sounds.
The bottom line is; life has taught me that spending "Klimax" money on equipment is very much a minority sport. Give the average person 100K to spend and a Klimax setup would not even be on their list of 100 top buys (to be honest it would not be on mine at the 100K level, it might be at the 1M level). A look at the equipment byline on many posts would cause Joe Average to wonder at the sanity of these people.
The music industry most likely understands exactly the problem they are in, but a download facility for masters is not going to make them serious money in the next 10 years.
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2011-02-05, 12:07 (This post was last modified: 2011-02-05 12:17 by manicm.)
Post: #33
RE: Major change in the music industry
(2011-02-05 05:12)linnrd Wrote:  People, on average, spend more time sitting in cars each day while commuting than they do sitting down listening to music. (Substitute this for spending time on the internet/watching TV/gaming/[insert extreme sport of choice] and you have a more prominant disconnect.) Once there is an acceptance of this fact, it is easier to understand why the priority of spending money (or time looking into the options) on audio equipment is more or less non-existent for the majority of the populace.

The value of listening to music for the sake of listening to music has diminished greatly. This could be traced back to the introduction of the Walkman, which allowed the opportunity to listen to music anywhere/everywhere; instead of raising the value of the activity, it hugely diminished it. Very simply people were listening to music in the background while walking instead of getting in their walk (physical activity) while listening to music. Anyone expecting to see a sea-change in this attitude after 30 years of evolution is self-delusional or on some wonderful chemicals that I will have to procure.

Add to this the music industry's push to "move product" as part of the response to the Reaganomic market instead of their prior model of cultivating artists, and it is not surprising that the current situation has arisen. It is important to note that the decision-makers in the industry are from the school of business and not from the world of music. For this thread to be titled "A major change in the music industry" is either an attempt to get a catchy headline or is, sadly, catching up to the fact about 30 years too late.

There will always be a segment that will exult in good sound and music. The reality is that this segment is in the tail of the normal distribution rather than somewhere in the hump. Offering high quality downloads and hi-resolution formats (vinyl/Blu-ray) will do nothing to change the reverse the trend of devaluing music. It is going to be interesting to see the state of the music industry 20-50 years from now; artists/companies catering to the minority that are interested in music and sound quality will continue to thrive as long as they fulfill the needs of this small proportion. They rest...really...just...don't care that much. Until an attempt is made to make the rest actually care about music, which itself is going to be an interesting social experiment, there is no reason to expect a reversal of fortunes.

Yes and No. Thing is in my country's economic hub (in all respects) of 7,018 square miles, where a large area of roads are being tolled for the first time. We as motorists are already being fleeced by large fuel levys at the pumps, and this is going to add great woes to people's lives - it means the general cost of living will rise greatly.

We have a public transport plan (our general public transport system is currently dire) taking shape but it won't be a panacea for everybody. And where people can't use general transport they will resort to car pools - which will dictate shorter working hours at the office.

This will also force employers - be it big corporates or smaller companies - to facilitate working at home. And if I can work at home why not? And naturally in such a case one's home entertainment is at instant disposal - in such a scenario one may well spend more on such equipment to make working more pleasurable.

And I believe working at home for some in UK is not a strange concept either. And will become an increasing reality worldwide I guess.

An increasing number of working people globally willl by necessity be forced to using the car less often.
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2011-02-05, 16:24 (This post was last modified: 2011-02-05 16:33 by JohnC.)
Post: #34
RE: Major change in the music industry
Hi,

Well much as I agree with some of the posts on here I think a simple point has been overlooked.

Today the people that buy music players in the main want something simple and in one box. The mobile phone is very quickly becoming the calendar, notebook, camera, music player, internet access point and, oh yes, a phone! (Oh and I forgot, my new phone also has Sat-Nav)!

The other fact people seem to overlook is that people want music on the move, why have a HiFi in a house when they can keep in touch with their friends while walking, driving, having dinner, going to the pub and have music as well. Need I go on?

The market whatever the posts on here say for high quality music is just not there for the average person in the street. They could not care what it sounds like as long as it plays music and they can get it easily. Do you really think people will pay for higher quality downloads when simple MP3 files fit the bill, I think not.

The HiFi market is shrinking for all but a few, the market does not really serve the beginner. Look at the posts on here and other forums where people are looking for second hand equipment because they cannot buy new as it is so expensive.

So the market for high quality music will remain as it always was for those in a minority.

As for Apple, the big guns are out to overtake them in all their areas of products, phones, tablets, internet access points and music players. Their time is coming, you might still be able to buy iTunes, but my guess is that a great majority will be playing on products that are not made by Apple.

My two pence worth, I will retreat and keep my head down for the flac, or should that be MP3's Big Grin

Cheers

John

SPEAKER SYSTEM:- Well Tempered Amadeus GTAA / Dynavector XX2 MKII - P75 MK II / Linn LP12 - Ittok - Karma / Majik Pre Amp - Majik DS - Linn 2250 / Shahinian Arcs / HEADPHONE SYSTEM:- Naim Headline - AKG 701's - Beyerdynamics DT880's - Grado SR80is / ReadyNas Duo with UPS - iPad - Kinsky & Songbook
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2011-02-05, 19:33 (This post was last modified: 2011-02-05 19:34 by billzab.)
Post: #35
RE: Major change in the music industry
Reading all this with interest guy's, and thought I would stick my oar in, so here are my thoughts.

1. We (top end H-Fi users) are not in the headlights of the current music industry. Why, because we are middle aged. Not old, but middle aged. The music industry, while embracing itunes MP3, are clinging on to CD for dear life. Look at the adverts on the TV at Christmas, Valentines day, etc. They are all about getting people to buy these CD's as presents. They try to brainwash the downloading youth that parents would like this CD, or that CD. And it works.

There was an advert last fathers day for some 'Driving Compilation' and my son was sitting next to me when it came on the TV. 'Do you fancy that' he said. I told him that if he ever bought me a CD that contained 'Boston's More than a feeling', I would cut him out my will. I felt quite proud of myself, knowing that I had ruled out the possiblity of hime finding any compilation without it.

I read somewhere a while back that the majority of CD's sold these days, are sold as presents for someone else. And old folk still buy CD's because they don't trust or understand downloads.

2. I disagree with those that say the music industry is dead or dying. It is dead as far as we hi-fi users are concerned. But what has been the top rated show in the UK over the last 5 years. Yes, love it or hate it, it's the X-Factor. And what is it about? It's about music. Yes Music and selling music. Maybe not the kind of music we like, but it is music none the less. Interesting X-Factor fact: The shows final gets well over 15 million viewers, yet the sales of winning single is counted in the thousands. Why? Because music has gone visual. Yep, Video killed the radio star! If the X-Factor was a radio show, how many would listen to it? Not many.

My neighbours teenage daughter does not download songs to her iPod, she downloads videos or watches them on MTV or You-Tube. It's throw away stuff, but the kids of today don't care. I still listen to albums I bought over 35 years ago, how many of todays generation will be able to say that? So it's new act after new act for the kids and repackage, repackage, repackage for the oldies.

3. I am currently trying to sell my Classik to enable me to upgrade my Sneaky to a MajikDS. I have asked my friends and work collegues if they are interested in it, and guess what, no takers. Why? Most of them don't actually sit down and listen to music. One lad was interested because he could play his x-box and TV through it, until he found out it was not 5.1. Another comment was, can I play my ipod through it? Yes I said and your CD's. Don't bother with them any more was the reply. So who's going to buy it? If I manage to sell it, I bet it is to someone over the age of 40, who still has a collection of CD's and does not have an iPod or download account.

4. The only good thing to come out of the demise of the CD and the sale of music is the upsurge of live music. Bands now tour more than they ever did or had to do. My last gig was to see 'The Gaslight Anthem'. These boys wont get on the TV much, and probably don't want to, but boy are they good live. Only problem is this doesnt help the cause for Hi-Fi users.

One thing is for sure, what ever the future of the Music Industry is, it won't give a thought to us Hi-Fi buff's. We need to understand, we are a minority as far as the big players are concerned.

Feel free to pick this to bitsBig Grin. Cheers, Bill

All views expressed in my posts are my own and if they offend anyone, then too bad.
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2011-02-05, 19:59
Post: #36
RE: Major change in the music industry
Hi Billzab, Have to say I like your user title Wink and the sticking the oar in thing. Smile

Not much
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2011-02-05, 20:02
Post: #37
RE: Major change in the music industry
(2011-02-05 19:59)SaltyDog Wrote:  Hi Billzab, Have to say I like your user title Wink and the sticking the oar in thing. Smile

User title entirely inspired by yours, Salty. Cheers.

All views expressed in my posts are my own and if they offend anyone, then too bad.
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2011-02-05, 20:24
Post: #38
RE: Major change in the music industry
I am in my early 30s so there is still hope, Bill Smile I even have a turntable with tube pre and amp!

But you are right. When I go to events at my dealer's I find that almost everyone looks older than me.

Every now and then a friend or colleague comes to me asking for advice on audio systems. It is almost always for home theater and on the rare occasion that it is for stereo, they tell me their budget is $400 or so. But they spend thousands on a giant TV and are willing to spend $800 or so if the system is Bose.

It is a lonely world of audio I live in but sometimes it makes me feel special Smile

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2011-02-05, 20:33
Post: #39
RE: Major change in the music industry
Maybe I'm ignorant, but I think most people actually are quality focused if aware there are quality differences. If given the choise people would buy FLAC, even high-res if it were available and not that more expensive than MP3:s. I think so even if they realised it would not make much difference on there current music listening gear, but just knowing that buying better equipment could exploit the differences would be enough argument, me think.

Another thing is that most equipment are seriously insufficient for reproducing anything resembling the sound and feeling of a live performance. MP3 can never do that. For that it is clearly too limited. The fact is, people are actually ripped off from the major part of the music experience. When informed of this fact people will act with there wallets. To this day, the information in this direction are just about zero.

CD where marketed as the superior format over vinyl and MC:s, but the claims where somewhat flawed and people realised that. Not immediately, but the effect is obvious; people changed the way they consumed music - from qualitative to quantitative. The industry did not listen and have not recovered from the defeat. At the same time music video:s where introduced shifting the focus of the music experience from audible to a visual experience. The difference between prtable and stationary experience where diminnished by the fact that CD where not that good - stationary or portable - did not do much difference.

However, I am not that pessimistic as most of you are. I think it is possible to open up peoples ears and one way is the fact that more artist are touring and giving conserts, showing people what music actually is all about. A re-take of the happenng of the 50:s and 60:s. It is sad though that we have to live through the dark ages of recorded compressed music.
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2011-02-05, 20:52
Post: #40
RE: Major change in the music industry
Until we have terabytes of memory available cheaply in portable devices, I highly doubt lossless will gain ground. Phones and mp3 players are limited to about 50-100 gb these days making it impossible to fit thousands of songs in lossless. CDs are starting to become what Vinyl has become - obsolete. I wouldnt expect things to change drastically in this decade.

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