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Saved to serve again.
2018-06-21, 18:01 (This post was last modified: 2018-06-24 15:22 by What You See and Hear.)
Post: #1
Saved to serve again.
Hi

This was an interesting and fulfilling rebuild of an LP12 which was pretty well as it was in 1975. The new owner of this old deck was aghast as its journey to him after purchase from Ebay wasn't good. He asked the seller for the arm to be taken off before sending and luckily it arrived intact but the deck got bashed to bits.

On inspection it was obvious that it had suffered some damage beyond repair. The old stay support lid was smashed and the plinth was crushed at the corners and the mitres split. The arm-rest was broken and the belt guide squashed. However the arm was fine as seemed the early bearing, platter and mechanical parts.

We carry many older LP12 parts and the request was to rebuild using these keeping the deck as far as possible "of its time", and we had a nice solution in an immaculate and beautiful 1982 afromosia plinth with a very nice spring hinge tinted lid.

The arm is an uncommon S shape Grace G-840F with detachable metal head-shell and precedes the better known G-707 imported by Linn in the late 1970's. The cartridge is a high compliance Goldring G-900 IGC needing a new stylus.

It had some updates during its life including a glued steel chassis, Nirvana motor kit, Valhalla with a later motor and black bolts. Re-drilling the top-plate to match the later plinth was the first thing done and with a used metal belt guide made a good start to get the deck up to scratch again.

He luckily found a used G-840-F arm-rest in Japan for £50.00. The replacement stylus wasn't the same quality as the original but at only £90.00 would be a fraction the cost of the real thing which is no longer available.

On completion the arm was way too high at the back and had always been so. Perhaps back in the mid 1970's VTA wasn't considered as important as today. The arm is height adjustable but was at its lowest possible position so I removed the large thick aluminium top arm-board washer allowing the arm tube to get very close to parallel. The now rare early Linn rubber mat was also kept.

The end result shows even today the qualities that define a proper Sondek when set up properly. Not the same musical insight as a current "Linn" LP12 but still tells a musical story and is involving.

The deck will return in time for some relevant modern musical improvements like Cirkus but for now the new owner is delighted.


                               


Regards

Colin Macey. WYSAH Beaconsfield.

www.whatyouseeandhear.com
www.wysah.com
01494 681300.
email colin@wysah.com
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2018-06-21, 18:15
Post: #2
RE: Saved to serve again.
Nice write-up, it's always good to see an original LP12 brought back to life! And good pictures too!
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2018-06-21, 18:20
Post: #3
RE: Saved to serve again.
That 82 plinth looks lovely.

‘troll
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2018-06-21, 18:46
Post: #4
RE: Saved to serve again.
Always enjoy this type of story.
Another one back on the musical path, good work Colin.
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2018-06-21, 21:13
Post: #5
RE: Saved to serve again.
My deck is a 1975 vintage model as well, SN 14,254 I believe. I wonder how close to mine this one was manufactured. The top plate and outer platter are all that remain on mine.

LP12 (S/N 14xxx), Black ash plinth, Cirkus, Radikal, Kore, Ittok LVIII Mark 2, Krystal, Audiotech stand, Urika II, 530 system
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2018-06-22, 05:47
Post: #6
RE: Saved to serve again.
What did they do to it!!!!!!!
Mucking fuppets.

Sondek, Hammond, Leslie, Rhodes and Moog.
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2018-06-22, 14:42
Post: #7
RE: Saved to serve again.
One of my decks is a 78 top on an 89 plinth. 85 dust cover, late model Ittok, Cirkus/Kore bearing subchassis armboard, new fixings, springs and grommets, black T-Kable, Mober Maxxon motor and controller, and FrankenKrystal cartridge.

It was built from the cast off parts left in the quest for a high spec LP12.

It’s really a joy to play. And it cost very little. The rest of the cast off parts were easy to sell on eBay. There are people upgrading their LP12s from every era.

It’s about the music, not the gear. Just listen - or not.
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2018-06-22, 17:47
Post: #8
RE: Saved to serve again.
Nice save job, Colin. It is always gratifying to help a customer get up and running after a mishap like that.

The worst one I had to deal with was not an LP12 but a Transcriptors Hydraulic Reference turntable with an SME 3009 S2 arm. Since most will not be familiar with it I will mention that it got the Hydraulic Reference name from the use of a donut shaped trough attached to the bearing spindle under the platter filled with thick silicone fluid. A vane would be pushed into the fluid to cause drag and change pitch on the synchronous motor. (Like almost everything Transcriptors made it was a well machined, Rube Goldberg type of device.) Here is what it looks like:

[Image: F1gYpLO.jpg]


The seller was an idiot and failed to remove the fluid before shipping. He also didn't remove the platter nor the arm. Most people would have taken one look at it and called it a total loss: hydraulic fluid all over the place, including engulfing the cartridge, non-removable headshell twisted up, bearing housing hanging by one of three bolts, etc. I told him I would be willing to attempt it but it would cost him two hours of labor even if I couldn't fix it and probably at least 7 hours, plus a new cartridge if I could.

He decided to go for it and we both got lucky. The fluid hadn't gotten into the arm bearings or motor area, I was actually able to straighten out the headshell, and I found the missing bearing parts in the box. He already had a new belt and replacement fluid. So I was able to get it up and running properly and there was no sign of the damage when I got through with it. He was elated that he could get this iconic turntable that he had lusted after for decades up and running in his system. It was an interesting experience and since then I have used the knowledge gained to restore two more of these for other people.

LP12SE Movingui • KRadikal • Kandid • Urika • Kremlin • LS-NAS • KRDS • Lejonklou Sagatun Monos & Tundra Mono 2As • JBL 3677s & 4645C Sub • NOKTable • Harmoni Mimer/Tor Racks
AV: Pioneer BDP51 BluRay • Akurate Kontrol • 2 LK280 SPARK • 4 Isobarik DMS • 2 DQ1W

www.nokturneaudio.com

Fine-tuning LP12s since 1978!
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2018-06-23, 21:21
Post: #9
RE: Saved to serve again.
(2018-06-22 17:47)ThomasOK Wrote:  Nice save job, Colin. It is always gratifying to help a customer get up and running after a mishap like that.

The worst one I had to deal with was not an LP12 but a Transcriptors Hydraulic Reference turntable with an SME 3009 S2 arm. Since most will not be familiar with it I will mention that it got the Hydraulic Reference name from the use of a donut shaped trough attached to the bearing spindle under the platter filled with thick silicone fluid. A vane would be pushed into the fluid to cause drag and change pitch on the synchronous motor. (Like almost everything Transcriptors made it was a well machined, Rube Goldberg type of device.) Here is what it looks like:

[Image: F1gYpLO.jpg]


The seller was an idiot and failed to remove the fluid before shipping. He also didn't remove the platter nor the arm. Most people would have taken one look at it and called it a total loss: hydraulic fluid all over the place, including engulfing the cartridge, non-removable headshell twisted up, bearing housing hanging by one of three bolts, etc. I told him I would be willing to attempt it but it would cost him two hours of labor even if I couldn't fix it and probably at least 7 hours, plus a new cartridge if I could.

He decided to go for it and we both got lucky. The fluid hadn't gotten into the arm bearings or motor area, I was actually able to straighten out the headshell, and I found the missing bearing parts in the box. He already had a new belt and replacement fluid. So I was able to get it up and running properly and there was no sign of the damage when I got through with it. He was elated that he could get this iconic turntable that he had lusted after for decades up and running in his system. It was an interesting experience and since then I have used the knowledge gained to restore two more of these for other people.

I remember this turntable well though mine had the long sweeping legs. I bought mine in 1977 but only kept it for a a year or so. The dust it used to attract was just awful with it, can you believe, being sucked inside through the hole in the side of the lid that allowed the record dust sweep arm to track the record when the lid was closed and because of that it always looked terrible. I sold it and bought my first LP12.

Majik DS, Inneos CD ripper, Simon Price Oak LP12, Black Ittok, Lingo3, Circus, Tranquility, Dynavector 20X2L, Lehman black signature phono, Exotik pre amp, x4 LK100 power amps, Keltic Aktiv speakers, Ikea rack, Cadenzas on phono, Cadenzas and Linn silvers connect the 6 amps, Chord Odyssey II.
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2018-06-24, 00:14 (This post was last modified: 2018-06-24 00:28 by LD100.)
Post: #10
RE: Saved to serve again.
(2018-06-23 21:21)Wiltshireman Wrote:  I remember this turntable well though mine had the long sweeping legs. I bought mine in 1977 but only kept it for a a year or so. The dust it used to attract was just awful with it, can you believe, being sucked inside through the hole in the side of the lid that allowed the record dust sweep arm to track the record when the lid was closed and because of that it always looked terrible. I sold it and bought my first LP12.

Nothing beats the looks of a classic turntable...well done Mr. Macey and Mr. O"Keefe! Smile

I always preferred the looks of the glass Irish Transcriptor Skeleton, not to play records on, that's what my LP12 is for, just to look at.
Bought it in 1976 and the dealer said..."don't play it, something will break, just look at it."

So I look at it while playing my LP12. Big GrinTongueBig Grin
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Original 1978 Fluted Afromosia LP12, Ekos 2, Lyra Kleos SL and lots of other stuff from the 70's that still work fine.
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